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29
JANUARY 2019
Management Hints
www.irishfarmersmonthly.com
JANUARY 2019
www.irishfarmersmonthly.com
Management Hints
acre
Index 1: P = 36units/acre; K = 90 units/acre,
Index 2: P = 28units/acre; K = 65 units/acre
Rates required vary with SR/acre and with
fixation capacity of soils, especially P. The
rates are approximate and may vary with
Nitrates rules.
Maintenance: P & K for silage:
1st Cut: P= 15-20 units/acre; K= 100units/
acre
2nd Cut: P = 14 units/acre: K = 60 units/acre.
Set out a simple plan with only a few
variations for low/high P & K areas.
Minimise the number of fertiliser products
required,
Get P out early; either early spring (75 per
cent of annual quantity) or autumn,
Avoid excess K in spring (risk of tetany); if
extra required apply in autumn or a little
throughout the season,
1000 gallons slurry = 1 bag 5:5:30 and should
be applied to silage ground.
BE READY FOR CALVING & CALF REARING
X
Calf rearing is massively demanding on help and
care. Have you a plan in place to minimise labour
requirements while at same time maximising care
of the calf? SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures)
should be made out for calving and calf rearing and
displayed in those sheds. The AHI leaflets will help
towards this task.
X
Calf pneumonia costs 136 per calf, occurring on
nearly 50 per cent of all farms and being responsible
for 13 per cent mortality in young calves
Prevention is the name of the game.
Improve the ventilation and reduce the number
of calves in one air space and calves passing
through each pen.
Vaccinate if it is an ongoing problem some
farmers have got positive results from IBR
vaccine up the nose after birth where it is an
ongoing problem
X
The earlier you calve the longer calves will be in
houses
Requires more labour to feed and clean them.
The risk of scour and pneumonia increases
greatly.
So, plan to delay calving next year until early
February.
X
Your Plan show it to the person with calf rearing
responsibilities.
Calve cows in clean calving boxes; you need one
for every 10 cows in the herd with plenty of straw
Disinfect calf's naval
Follow the 1:2:3 rule on colostrum. Use a stomach
tube (clean) to make it happen
Put him in a pen with not more than five calves
and feed him milk/milk subs by way of multiple
teat feeder with five teats and each calf's
feed divided in the feeder. This prevents the
quick drinker getting too much, which is the
main reason for scouring. I don't recommend
individual calf pens as they are too laborious and
only suitable for small units.
Then move the calf, when drinking fast enough to
keep up, into a pen with 10 calves on a multiple,
compartmentalised feeder.
Then move calves out to fields with grass from
3-4 weeks of age onto a 30 to 50-teat multiple
feeder. Many farmers are doing this successfully.
For this to work well the calf needs a dry
sheltered field. Maybe a run back to a haybarn
type shed would also work. Straw or good hay in a
rack is also required. It is best if the milk flows to
the calf rather than having the calf having to work
hard by sucking from below his height.
X
To avoid spreading John's Disease, do not batch feed
cow's milk to replacement heifers, feed milk replacer
"Calf rearing is massively demanding. Have
you a plan in place to minimise labour
requirements while at same time maximising
care of the calf? Standard Operating Procedures
should be made out for calving and calf
rearing and displayed in those sheds. The
AHI leaflets will help towards this task."