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JANUARY 2019
Feature
www.irishfarmersmonthly.com
The effects associated with mycotoxicosis in dairy cows
can be diverse and difficult to diagnose and include:
Reduced feed intake
Scouring/bloody faeces
Reduced milk production
Reduced fertility
Increased somatic cell count
Increased disease susceptibility
Control and monitor
There are many ways to help control and monitor
mycotoxins. No singular method gives full protection on
its own, but when some key guidelines are put in place,
the risk of mycotoxins can be mitigated.
In the event that the symptoms above are verified as being
the result of mycotoxin contamination, the most effective
way of dealing with the mycotoxin issue is to eliminate
the mould formation and minimise the feeding of affected
forages by discarding spoiled feed.
An effective mycotoxin binder should be fed as part
of the diet. They are called binders because they work
by "binding" to harmful mycotoxins, preventing them
from being absorbed by the cow. Mycotoxin binders
vary greatly, but there are two main types on the market:
organic binders and inorganic binders, the latter of which
are made from clay and organic binders. Organic binders
will bind more efficiently to a greater range of mycotoxins,
reducing mycotoxin absorption without affecting vitamin
and mineral counts.
Mycosorb A+ is a broad-spectrum, organic binder based
on a specific strain of yeast. It tackles mycotoxins as a
whole rather than dealing with individual mycotoxins.
Its binding capabilities, broader absorption profile and
increased efficacy sets it apart from its competitors. The
effects of adding Mycosorb to the diet can be seen within
24 hours. Mycosorb can be included in feed or through
farm pack.
Ergot toxins
Other aspergillus
Other Penicillium Mycotoxins
Emergency Mycotoxins
Fusaric Acid
Zearalenones
Fumosisins
Type A Trichothecenes
Type B Trichothecenes
Ochratoxins/Citrinin
Aflatoxins, Total
Aflatoxins B1
Variable dry matter intake?
Leg and udder swelling?
Poor conception rates?
Emryonic loss or calf abortion?
Cystic ovaries?
Blood in dung?
Inconsistant dung?
Reduced milk or meat production?
Increased somatic cell count?
Necrosis (rot) of the tail?
Is your herd
showing
signs of:
Mycotoxin Occurrence %
19.42
11.65
46.6
52.4
3.98
22.22
56.31
9.71
1.95
15.53
11.65
0
15
30
45
60
34