Animal Health Focus AHI publishes monthly maps showing the distribution of both all PI are being retained (Figure 3; alive for more than 35 days after thei JULY 2018 www.irishfarmersmonthly.com Continued efforts to eliminate BVD Animal Health Ireland has made impressive progress in the elimination of BVD (Bovine Viral Diarrhea) from the national herd. This year the prevalence has dropped again. In addition, retention levels of PIs (persistently infected animals) have reduced. The warning from AHI is that animals whose status is not known should be identified and tested. In AHI’s latest newsletter the organisation outlines progress to date this year: “ As of 1st June, over 75 per cent of this year’s calf crop have been born and tested. The BVD results show that further progress toward eradication has been made. In 2018 to-date, the prevalence has reduced by 50% from that seen in 2017, from 0.10 per cent to 0.05 per cent (see Figure 1 below). And this reduction is even more dramatic when compared to the 0.66% prevalence in 2013, the first year of the compulsory programme, representing an estimated net benefit to farmers of 85 million euro in 2018 alone.” PI ANIMALS . % . % PREVALENCE OF PI ANIMALS ANIMAL HEA Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farmin AHI publishes monthly maps showing the distribution of both all PI are being retained (Figure 3; alive for more than 35 days after thei Figure 2. Number and distribution of BVD-positive animals that are still alive Figure anima weeks PI animals are unlikely to survive or thrive, and shed virus conti their own and neighbouring herds. Infection of susceptible femal will result in the creation of further PI calves. . % For infected herds, is important to remove positive animals as so pregnant animals are in this risk period. Until their removal, the measures implemented to avoid infecting animals within their ow . % . % . % . % . % . % . % . % In BVD-free herds, with breeding now underway, it is important herd so that infection is not accidentally introduced. . % . % . % Herdowners are encouraged to discuss all aspects of biosecurit their own veterinary practitioner. Week Focus on unknown status animals Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitr Figure 2. Number and distribution of BVD-positive Figure Phone 071 9671928 are still alive Web w animals that Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie anima weeks Animal Health Ireland says that a key focus over the next months will be the identification and testing of the small proportion of animals whose BVD status is not known. Herd owners are being contacted over the next few weeks with details of these animals. Substantial improvements have also been made in reducing the extent to which PIs are retained on farm. Figures up to the end of May show that 156 PIs are still alive on farms, of which only 31 PI animals in 23 herds are being retained beyond five weeks. Retention an unhealthy option 40 continuously, posing a risk to other animals in their own and neighbouring herds. Infection of susceptible fe- PI animals are unlikely to survive or thrive, and shed virus males between 30 and 120 days of pregnancy will result OF 2 PAGE 2 in the creation of further PI calves. Here is the informed advice from AHI: “for infected herds, it is important to remove positive unlikely as soon as possible, particularly virus conti PI animals are animals to survive or thrive, and shed now that many pregnant animals are in this risk period. their own and neighbouring herds. Infection of susceptible femal Until their removal, they should be isolated and biowill result in the creation of further PI calves. containment measures implemented to avoid infecting animals within their own and neighbouring herds. In BVDFor infected herds, is important to remove important free herds, with breeding now underway, it is positive animals as so pregnant animals are measures period. Until their to review all biosecurityin this riskin the herd so that removal, the measures not accidentally avoid infecting animals are infection is implemented to introduced. Herdownerswithin their ow encouraged to discuss all aspects of biosecurity, including In BVD-free herds, with breeding now underway, it is their vaccination policy, with their own veterinary practi-important tioner.so that infection is not accidentally introduced. herd Herdowners are encouraged to discuss all aspects of biosecurit their own veterinary practitioner.